Connecticut has specific provisions in the Home Improvement Act (“HIA”) as to what contractors need to ensure appears in their contracts with homeowners.[1] The statute requires contractors to make sure their contracts comply. Each contract must:

  1. be in writing;
  2. signed by the homeowner and contractor;
  3. contain the entire agreement between the owner and the contractor;
  4. include the date of the contract;
  5. contain the contractor’s name and address;
  6. contain a notice of the owner’s cancellation rights;
  7. contain a starting date and completion date for the work;
  8. executed by a registered contractor or salesman; and
  9. list a 5-year history of each corporation, limited liability company, partnership, sole proprietorship or other legal entity the contractor has been a shareholder, member, partner, or owner during the previous five years.[2]

The Act can be satisfied by more than one writing read together as a whole.

HIA provides that “[n]o home improvement contract shall be valid or enforceable against an owner” unless it meets each of these requirements. Meaning that a contractor seeking payment or seeking to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien for nonpayment should make sure that the conditions have been met, or they may be out of luck.

At Yoars Law, we focus on being proactive legal advisors for our construction clients, guiding them through the complex legal issues as they arise, including drafting and reviewing contracts. We also provide transparent and predictable legal fees so our clients can consistently manage their budgets.

 

[1] Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 20-418 through 20-432.

[2] Conn. Gen. Stat. § 20-429.

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